GovWire

Weekly national flu and COVID-19 surveillance reports published

Public Health England

January 14
15:36 2021

Latest update

The main points from this weeks national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates have declined while hospitalisations, ICU admissions and mortality continued to increase during week 1 of 2021, between 4 and 10 January.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups except in those 80 and above, with the highest rate 879.7 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 continue to be the highest in London, with a rate of 864.9 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have decreased in all locations except for the North West, South West and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,627 in week 1, compared to 1,200 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 37.20 per 100,000 in week 1, compared to 29.50 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the North East. London continues to have the highest with a rate of 58.19

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The rate that people are being admitted to hospital is now higher than at any point during the pandemic. We are still seeing thousands of people having to go to hospital each day. Worryingly, these numbers are likely to continue to get worse before we see the benefits of our efforts to protect the NHS, which will mean more pressure for our health service than ever before.

Please act as though you have the virus. Around 1 in 3 of us wont show symptoms but can still infect others who could become very unwell. This is why we all need to stay at home, so we can protect our NHS and save lives.

Previous updates

Thursday 7 January 2021

The main points from this weeks national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has continued to increase during week 53 between 28 December and 3 January.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 842.5 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions and are the highest in London with a rate of 904.8 per 100,000 population.

The West Midlands has seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population, with 530.2 in week 53 compared to 292.6 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,200 in week 53, compared to 846 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 27.6 per 100,000 in week 53, compared to 21.51 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions and London is the highest with a rate of 43.38.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

I want to pay tribute to staff across the health service who are working flat out to manage this virus and care for patients. The data bring into focus the huge pressure the health service is under. Sadly, we are seeing more deaths each day and these numbers will continue to rise before we see the impact of the nationwide lockdown.

We saw a sharp acceleration in infection rates last week to the highest levels since mass testing began. It is of particular concern that rates are high in those in older age groups who are at risk of more serious illness as well as people in their twenties and thirties.

There is one simple and critical thing we can all do to help control the virus and reduce infection. Stay at home, it will protect the NHS and save lives. We have done this before to great effect and must do so again as we vaccinate the most vulnerable.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 80.3% in 65+ year olds
  • 51.5% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 43.1% in pregnant women
  • 54.0% in 2 year olds
  • 56.5% in 3 year olds
  • 47.5% in school-age children (as of 30 November)
  • 70.6% in healthcare workers (as of 30 November)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at Public Health England, said:

The flu vaccine saves lives. It is therefore very encouraging to see record-high uptake rates this season, especially among the groups most vulnerable to flu, who are also most at-risk from COVID-19.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu and we urge anyone who is eligible to take up the offer to help protect yourself, your family and the NHS.

Thursday 24 December 2020

The main points from this weeks national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has increased during week 51 between 14 and 20 December 2020.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 434.6 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 and 39.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions and are the highest in London with a rate of 602.2 per 100,000 population.

London has also seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population with 602.2 in week 51 compared to 361.8 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 922 in week 51, compared to 860 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 18.66 per 100,000 in week 51, compared to 15.18 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the North East but this region also has the highest rate of 23.44

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Cases and hospital admission rates are increasing across many parts of the country and the number of new daily infections are rising rapidly. This will not be a normal Christmas for any of us. If you are seeing loved ones, try to keep your distance, was your hands thoroughly and more often and ventilate as much as possible.

By continuing to reduce your contacts you can help to slow the spread of COVID-19. Remember that about 1 in 3 people may never experience any symptoms so could infect others without realising it.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 79.8% in over 65 year olds
  • 50.1% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 42.4% in pregnant women
  • 21.4% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 53.3% in 2 year olds
  • 55.7% in 3 year olds
  • 47.5% in school age children (as of 30 November)
  • 70.6% in healthcare workers (as of 30 November)

Thursday 17 December 2020

The main points from this weeks national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has increased during week 50 between 7 and 13 December 2020.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 268.3 per 100,000 population during week 50 compared to 201.8 in the previous week seen in those aged between 40 to 49 year olds.

Case rates per 100,000 have only fallen in Yorkshire and the Humber; they have increased in all other regions.

Case rates per 100,000 continue to be the highest in London with a rate of 319.3 per 100,000 population.<

Related Articles

Comments

  1. We don't have any comments for this article yet. Why not join in and start a discussion.

Write a Comment

Your name:
Your email:
Comments:

Post my comment

Recent Comments

Follow Us on Twitter

Share This


Enjoyed this? Why not share it with others if you've found it useful by using one of the tools below: