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Department For Education

Guidance: School workforce census: guides27 Oct

Guidance: Remote education good practice27 Oct

Official Statistics: Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak: 23 March to 22 October 202027 Oct

Transparency data: Prompt payment data for DfE27 Oct

Press release: North East talent awarded prizes for education contributions26 Oct

Press release: Protections for working parents eligible for childcare support26 Oct

Press release: Protections for working parents eligible for childcare support26 Oct

Detailed guide: Get help with remote education26 Oct

Detailed guide: Remote education webinars26 Oct

Policy paper: College oversight: support and intervention26 Oct

Guidance: Example lessons for remote teaching26 Oct

Research and analysis: How early years providers support children26 Oct

Research and analysis: Occupancy and staff ratios at early years providers26 Oct

Research and analysis: Providers’ finances: survey of childcare and EY providers 201926 Oct

TUESDAY, 27 OCTOBER 2020  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

How to trade in plants and plant products, including trees, inside and outside the EU from 1 January 2021.

‘Plant’ means a living plant (including a fungus or tree) or a living part of a plant (including a living part of a fungus or shrub), at any stage of growth.

‘Plant product’ means products of plant origin, unprocessed or having undergone simple preparation, in so far as these are not plants, including wood and bark.

Importing plants and plant products into England, Scotland and Wales from the EU

The UK has left the EU. There will be new processes that importers must follow in 2021. These processes will start in 3 stages.

Importing plants and plant products from the EU from 1 January 2021

High-priority plants and plant products from the EU must have:

  • a phytosanitary (health) certificate (PC)
  • a pre-notification submitted by the importer in England, Scotland or Wales
  • documentary and identity checks
  • a physical inspection

You will have to pay for these services.

The plant types on this list include:

  • all plants for planting
  • ware potatoes
  • some seed and timber
  • used agricultural or forestry machinery

See the new import requirements for high priority plants and products from 1 January 2021 (ODT, 9.02KB).

If you want a physical plant health inspection for EU-regulated high priority plants you can become a ‘place of destination’ from 1 January until 30 June 2021. Read about how operators can register and what requirements you will need to meet.

This replaces the ‘place of first arrival’ scheme which ran from January 2020. Companies that are currently registered on this scheme will be contacted directly by APHA.

You must pre-notify for imports of solid fuel wood that are not regulated. You do not need a PC for these imports.

Importing plants and plant products from 1 April 2021

You must use the relevant IT system to notify the Animal Plant Health Agency (APHA) that you’re importing regulated plants and plant products. This guide will publish details of these IT systems before 1 January 2021.

All regulated plants and plant products imported to England, Scotland or Wales from the EU must have phytosanitary certificates (PCs), which takes up to 7 days to get. Find out how to get a phytosanitary certificate.

APHA will inspect the PCs in England and Wales. The Scottish Government will inspect PCs in Scotland.

Regulated plants and plant products include:

  • all plants for planting
  • root and tubercle vegetables
  • some common fruits other than fruit preserves by deep freezing
  • some cut flowers
  • some seeds and grains
  • leafy vegetables other than vegetables preserved by deep freezing
  • potatoes from some countries
  • machinery or vehicles which have been operated for agricultural or forestry purposes

Plants that will not need a phytosanitary certificate for EU import from 1 April 2021

You will not need a phytosanitary certificate for these plants from 1 April 2021:

  • fruit and vegetables that have been processed and packaged (salads, sandwiches, frozen material)
  • composite products (nut or seed butters that contain processed fruit or vegetables)

This list shows the other plant and plant products that you do not need a phytosanitary certificate to import from the EU to the UK from 1 April 2021.

Botanical name and requirement Common name
Fruit of Ananas comosus Pineapple
Fruits of Actinidia sp. Lindl, Kiwi
Fruits of Cocos nucifera L Coconut
Fruit and leaves of Citrus sp. L. Fruit and leaves of Citrus
Fruit of Fortunella sp. Swingle Kumquat
Fruit of Poncirus L. Raf Bitter orange
Fruit of Diospyros sp. L. Persimmon
Fruits of Durio zibethinus Murray Durian
Fruits (bolls) of Gossypium spp. Cotton (bolls)
Leaves of Murraya spp. Curry leaf
Fruits of Musa Banana and plantain
Fruits of Mangifera sp. L. Mango
Fruits of Phoenix dactylifera L. Dates
Fruits of Passiflora sp. L Passionfruit
Fruits of Psidium sp. Guava

Importing plants and plant products from 1 July 2021

Regulated plants and plant products will have extra documentary checks and physical inspections.

You must use the relevant IT system to notify APHA that you’re importing regulated plants and plant products. This guide will publish details of these IT systems before 1 January 2021

Making a pre-notification

You must give advance notice to the responsible authority each time you bring a regulated consignment to the UK.

You need to give notice of:

  • at least four working hours before the goods land in the UK, for air and ‘roll-on-roll-off’ freight
  • at least one working day before the goods arrive in the UK for all other freight

Exempt plants and plant products for import

These plants and plant products are already exempt from import controls in England, Scotland and Wales:

  • pineapple
  • coconut
  • durian
  • bananas
  • dates

They will continue to be exempt from import controls after 31 December 2020.

Importing prohibited and high-risk plants and plant products

Prohibited plants

Some plants are prohibited from entering the UK from third countries on plant health grounds. These prohibitions will not apply to plants and products imported from the EU.

High-risk plants

These are plants and plant products that due to pest risk level cannot be introduced to the UK from third countries unless they have a risk assessment.

This will not apply to the import of high-risk plants and plant products from the EU to the UK from 1 January 2021.

See the full list of high-risk plants and plant products.

Steps to take now to prepare for 1 January 2021

To prepare for 1 January 2021 you need to:

TUESDAY, 27 OCTOBER 2020  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

How to register for the groupage exports facilitation scheme (GEFS), eligible products, and requirements for exporters and suppliers including inspections.

Exporters and suppliers who export multiple products (known as groupage exports) of animal origin from Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) to, or through, the EU will be able to use GEFS from 1 January 2021.

You’ll also be able to use the GEFS to help move multiple products from Great Britain to, or through, Northern Ireland.

A groupage export is defined as either:

  • different commodity types grouped in a single container
  • quantities of the same commodity type from more than one source, grouped in the same container
  • multiple products of the same commodity type grouped as a single consignment

The GEFS will allow you to use 30 day support attestations (SAs) to provide information to a certifying officer - usually an Official Veterinarian (OV) - about your exports.

You’ll need a Export Health Certificate for each consignment when you’re exporting using GEFS. Products exported using GEFS have to meet the same animal health standards and provide traceability information in order for the product to be certified.

Certifying officers can use this information to complete the export health certificate (EHC) you must get to export animal products.

You must apply to join the GEFS to use the 30 day SAs.

Products you can export

You can use the scheme to help with the export of the following products of animal origin for human consumption:

  • composite products
  • processed meat products, including gelatine
  • meat preparations
  • processed milk and matured or processed dairy products
  • fish or fisheries products
  • eggs or egg products
  • honey
  • frogs’ legs
  • snails and bivalve molluscs

You can also use it for processed pet food.

These products must be:

  • fully packaged for the final consumer (or to be re-packaged directly at the point of sale for the final consumer)
  • produced using animal content from known suppliers

You cannot use the scheme to export:

  • fresh meat
  • raw milk
  • products of animal origin not for human consumption (except processed pet food)
  • live animals
  • germinal products

Apply to join the scheme

To become a member of the GEFS you need to complete the application form and email it with a copy of your current supplier list to GEFS@defra.gov.uk.

It usually takes 5 working days to process your application.

You’ll be sent an official acceptance, usually by email.

You must keep this acceptance as you may be asked to show it as proof of your membership.

The following details of your organisation will be listed on GOV.UK so certifying officers can check you are currently part of the scheme:

  • organisation name
  • organisation address
  • membership number

Requirements for exporters

As an exporter, to use the scheme you must:

  • be listed as a member of the GEFS
  • source all animal products in your exports from a documented and stable supplier list
  • use suppliers listed with the EU
  • make your supplier list available on request from a certifying officer

Your supplier list must contain all your suppliers of animal products that are exported to, or through, the EU

You must ensure that your suppliers:

  • arrange inspections with a registered vet - they’ll need knowledge of your premises, processes and supply chain
  • agree in advance with you and the vet, what information they need to collect for the inspection
  • allow the vet access to their premises and records
  • ensure SAs are signed by an individual with authority to sign on behalf of your supplier
  • inform you and the vet who signed your SA immediately if there are any changes that affect the SA

Reference numbers

You must give a unique reference number to each original SA you use. You’ll need to decide what format the number should be and tell your supplier.

The suggested format is:

  1. Unique supplier number.
  2. Sequential number.
  3. Unique number for vet signing your SA.
  4. Year.

For example: 15435/0000001/m159607/2020.

Requirements for suppliers

As a supplier, to provide products to be exported under the scheme, you must:

  • arrange required inspections with the vet
  • agree with the vet what information they will require and gather the evidence for checks
  • provide a suitable representative to complete and sign the supplier section of the SA
  • use the 30 day SA template to provide information to the registered vet
  • send a completed declaration with all products using an SA

Provide a suitable representative to sign the SA

The SA must be signed by someone who has:

  • sufficient knowledge of and responsibility for the production, transport and storage processes
  • been authorised in writing by the Managing Director (or equivalent) of the supplier to sign on behalf of the company

Supplier declaration

You must complete and send the following declaration with all products you’re using an SA for, to the exporter:

“The evidence required to facilitate export of the products in this consignment has been provided in support attestation [insert unique reference number].

No changes have been made that affect the validity of the information provided in this support attestation.”

Supplier inspections

You’ll have an initial veterinary inspection, followed by regular inspections each time you need a new SA.

Inspections are usually carried out by a registered vet, but the certifying officer may send a certification support officer (CSO). The vet will discuss this with you before the inspection.

You’ll need to agree with the vet and the exporter, before an inspection, what information is required and collect it.

Initial inspection

For the initial inspection, you’ll need to provide evidence of a documented and stable supply chain for the previous 6 months. This includes showing:

  • accurate supply chain, health, traceability and processing records for your products
  • there have been no changes that affect information certified in the EHC within the previous 30 calendar days, for example, a change to heat treatments
  • there have been no changes that affect information certified in the EHC in at least 4 of the previous 6 months

The only changes you’re allowed to make are any specifically to meet new export requirements for use after 1 January 2021, or because of disruption caused by COVID-19.

Vets cannot sign supporting attestations until they inspect the evidence of the supply chain.

Who signs the SA

The SA must be signed by both:

How long the SA is valid

An SA is valid for use from inspection up to and including the expiry date. This is usually 30 calendar days from the inspection date.

Checks on consignments

A certifyi

TUESDAY, 27 OCTOBER 2020  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

Apply to become a member of the groupage export facilitation scheme (GEFS).

Details

Exporters and suppliers who export multiple products (known as groupage exports) of animal origin from Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) to, or through, the EU will be able to use the GEFS from 1 January 2021.

To become a member of the GEFS you need to complete this application form and email it with a copy of your current supplier list to GEFS@defra.gov.uk.

It usually takes 5 working days to process your application.

You’ll be sent an official acceptance, usually by email.

You must keep this acceptance as you may be asked to show it as proof of your membership.

Published 27 October 2020