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Cabinet Office

Guidance: Coronavirus outbreak FAQs: what you can and can’t do29 May

Detailed guide: Answers to the most common topics asked about by the public for the coronavirus press conference29 May

Guidance: Staying safe outside your home29 May

Guidance: Staying alert and safe (social distancing)29 May

Guidance: Coronavirus outbreak FAQs: what you can and can’t do29 May

Policy paper: Fourth round UK-EU future relationship negotiations: 2-5 June 202028 May

Transparency data: Cabinet Office: senior officials’ gifts, hospitality and meetings, October to December 201928 May

Detailed guide: Answers to the most common topics asked about by the public for the coronavirus press conference28 May

Transparency data: Cabinet Office: Government Procurement Card spend over £50028 May

Policy paper: Government Lead Non-Executive’s annual report 2018 to 201928 May

Policy paper: Government Functional Standard - GovS 014: Debt28 May

Transparency data: Cabinet Office register of board members' interests 2017 to 201828 May

Correspondence: Letters from the Cabinet Secretary to Rachel Reeves MP and Ian Blackford MP28 May

Guidance: Support for the bereaved28 May

THURSDAY, 28 MAY 2020  |  AIR ACCIDENTS INVESTIGATION BRANCH

During ground roll, the tailplane detached from the Standard Cirrus 75 (G-DDGX). Signals for the takeoff to be aborted did not reach either pilot. The glider became airborne, climbed rapidly, before descending steeply and striking the ground, 27 July 2019.

The glider was undertaking an aerotow launch at Gwernesney Airfield in Monmouthshire. During the early stages of the ground roll the horizontal tailplane detached from G-DDGX and fell to the ground. Club members assisting with the launch signalled for the takeoff to be aborted but the message did not reach the aerotow tug pilot; the accident pilot did not appear to hear or see the stop signals either. The glider became airborne and climbed rapidly, before the tow cable released and the aircraft’s nose dropped. The glider descended steeply and struck the ground nose first. The pilot died five days later from complications related to injuries sustained in the accident.

The investigation determined that the tailplane had not been correctly attached when the glider was rigged and this was not detected prior to the flight. The precise manner in which the tailplane had been mis-rigged could not be determined.

Two Safety Recommendations are made relating to communication for glider launching and detecting incorrect alignment of tailplane locking features. In addition, the gliding club has undertaken several safety actions regarding launch signalling and detection of incorrect tailplane locking on other Standard Cirrus gliders.

THURSDAY, 28 MAY 2020  |  AIR ACCIDENTS INVESTIGATION BRANCH

Loss of control during aerotow launch after the horizontal tailplane detached, Gwernesney Airfield, Monmouthshire, 27 July 2019.

Summary:

The glider was undertaking an aerotow launch to the west at Gwernesney Airfield which was operated by the resident gliding club. During the early stages of the ground roll the horizontal tailplane (tailplane) detached from G-DDGX and fell to the ground. Club members assisting with the launch signalled for the takeoff to be aborted but the message did not reach the aerotow tug pilot; the accident pilot did not appear to hear or see the stop signals either. The glider became airborne and climbed rapidly, before the tow cable released and the aircraft’s nose dropped. The glider descended steeply and struck the ground nose first. It came to rest inverted pointing in an easterly direction. First responders extricated the pilot from the aircraft before he was airlifted to hospital. He died five days later from complications related to injuries sustained in the accident.

The investigation determined that the tailplane had not been correctly attached when the glider was rigged and this condition was not detected prior to the flight. Several possible mis-rigging scenarios were identified during the investigation, but the precise manner in which the tailplane had been mis-rigged could not be determined.

Two Safety Recommendations are made relating to communication for glider launching and detecting incorrect alignment of tailplane locking features. In addition, the gliding club has undertaken several safety actions regarding launch signalling and detection of incorrect tailplane locking on other Standard Cirrus gliders.

Download report:

Standard Cirrus 75, G-DDGX 06-20

Download glossary of abbreviations:

Glossary of abbreviations

Published 28 May 2020
Published 29 March 2020
Last updated 29 May 2020 + show all updates
  1. Updated to include new guidance.

  2. Link added to NHS testing and tracing for coronavirus.

  3. Addition of text 'You should be prepared to remove your face covering if asked to do so by police officers and staff for the purposes of identification.'

  4. Updated the FAQs to bring them in line with the latest announcements.

  5. The changes reflect the updated regulations that were signed into law on 22nd April and to reflect the latest PHE guidance. All have been cleared by No10 and the Health Secretary.

  6. First published.

THURSDAY, 28 MAY 2020  |  CABINET OFFICE

Data on gifts and hospitality received by senior officials, and meetings they attended with senior media figures.

Cabinet Officer senior officials (SCS2 and above) expenses: October to December 2019

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Cabinet Officer senior officials (SCS2 and above) hospitality: October to December 2019

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Cabinet Officer senior officials (SCS2 and above) meetings: October to December 2019

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Details

The Cabinet Office publishes quarterly details of senior officials’ meetings with senior media figures and any gifts or hospitality they received on a quarterly basis.

Published 28 May 2020

THURSDAY, 28 MAY 2020  |  CABINET OFFICE

Read answers to the questions that best capture most common topics people asked about.

The public has submitted over 300,000 questions so far through the ‘Ask a question at the coronavirus press conference’ service. We’ve analysed 169,000 questions submitted between 10 May and 12 May and answered questions that best capture the 4 most common topics people asked about.

Social distancing, and seeing your family and friends

Can you clarify the difference between social distancing in a park with strangers rather than family and friends?

Exposure to the virus is based on a number of factors including the time that you spend in close proximity to people outside of your household and the number of other people that you spend time with. We realise this is difficult for families, but need to be clear that people must not be gathering in groups of more than two with people from other households.

Why am I allowed to meet in a park, but not in my garden?

You can now see one other person from a different household in an open public space. This has to be one-on-one, outdoors in an open public space and obeying strict social distancing. You cannot visit friends and family in their homes, including in private gardens.

Can I meet more than 1 member of another household while observing social distancing?

No. You can only meet one other person from outside your household in an open, public space while obeying strict social distancing. You will be breaking the law if you meet with more than one person from outside your household.

Safe social distancing guidance

When schools are reopening

What’s the rationale behind sending reception, year 1 and year 6 students back to school?

Early childhood is the most important time for cognitive, social and emotional development. That’s why we are prioritising places for the youngest children learning the essentials of reading, writing and counting. This also helps parents return to work, or work more effectively from home, given these children need the greatest care.

Pupils in other years will continue to be educated remotely until they return to school.

How do we make sure our children keep their distance from each other at school?

Through gradually increasing the number of children and young people attending schools and colleges, we’re able to take measures to reduce transmission, such as small group and class sizes, and altering the environment such as classroom layout and staggering break times. This all helps children to keep their distance from each other.

Schools are also putting in place measures to ensure the highest standards of safety. This will include more frequent washing of hands, encouraging good respiratory hygiene (cough etiquette) and regular cleaning of surfaces that are touched frequently.

Schools will be given advice in the coming week to ensure they can adequately prepare for the next phase.

The guidance is that if a child becomes unwell with a new, continuous cough, a high temperature, or loss of, or change in, their normal sense of smell or taste (anosmia) they must be sent home and advised to follow the COVID-19 guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection.

Is it safe to send my child back to school if we’re shielding?

For the vast majority of children and young people, coronavirus is a mild illness.

However, if someone in your household is extremely clinically vulnerable, as set out in the guidance on shielding and protecting people, then your child should only go to school or a childcare setting if stringent social distancing can be followed while they are both there and at home.

This may not be possible in the case of young children and older children without the capacity to adhere to the instructions on social distancing.

If social distancing rules cannot be followed, those children should be supported to learn or work at home.

Will I be fined if I choose not to send my child back to school because I don’t believe it’s safe?

No. We urge as many children in eligible groups as possible to attend. However, we will not fine parents for keeping their children at home.

What parents and carers need to know about schools

Using protective equipment in schools

Opening schools from 1 June

Rules for reopening businesses, and weddings

Can small gyms and clubs reopen if they follow social distancing and hygiene measures?

No, gyms and leisure centres remain closed, because the risk of transmission in these indoor environments is higher. You cannot exercise in an indoor fitness studio, gym, swimming pool, or other indoor leisure centres or facilities. They will reopen in phases provided it is safe to do so.

However, as of Wednesday 13 May, you can leave home to spend time in open public spaces more than once a day, with no time limit and for a wider range of reasons.

Are hairdressers and beauty salons classified as hospitality or retail? When can they reopen?

Hairdressers and beauty salons remain closed, at least until 4 July, because the risk of transmission in these environments is higher due to the indoor environment and closer physical contact. We will work with the personal care sector to develop safe ways for them to open at the earliest point at which it is safe to do so.

When will larger social gatherings and weddings be allowed?

Public gatherings are not allowed yet, because the risk of transmissions in spaces with large crowds is higher.

In phase two of the roadmap, we plan to allow slightly larger groups to meet. In specific public places, we also plan to allow for events such as small weddings. We will work with local authorities and faith groups to explore how best to achieve this safely in the coming weeks.

Cultural and sporting events will be taking place, but behind closed-doors for broadcast only.

When will other shops, such as shoe shops and shopping centres be reopened?

They will open in phases from 1 June, when and where it is safe to do so and subject to them being able to follow ‘COVID-19 secure’ guidelines.

Businesses and venues that cannot open yet

Plans to reopen non-essential retail

The COVID-19 alert level, blood donors and immunity

THURSDAY, 28 MAY 2020  |  CABINET OFFICE

This data provides details on Government Procurement Card spend over £500 for Cabinet Office.

Government Procurement Card data: April 2020

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Government Procurement Card data: March 2020

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Government Procurement Card data: February 2020

Government Procurement Card data: January 2020

Government Procurement Card data: December 2019

Government Procurement Card data: November 2019

Government Procurement Card data: October 2019

Government Procurement Card data: September 2019

THURSDAY, 28 MAY 2020  |  CABINET OFFICE

Sir Ian Cheshire, the Government Lead Non-Executive, has published his fifth annual report that covers April 2018 to March 2019.

Government Lead Non-Executive annual report 2018 to 2019

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Details

Sir Ian Cheshire’s fifth annual report as Government Lead Non-Executive looks at the board programme across Whitehall. It also covers the impact of non-executives in their departments and across Whitehall. It sets out progress towards Sir Ian Cheshire’s 3 cross-cutting priorities for the non-executives network:

  • Talent
  • Single Departmental Plans
  • Major Projects

The Government Corporate Governance Code states that the Government Lead Non-Executive will publish a report on progress every year.

Published 28 May 2020

Published 28 May 2020
Published 28 May 2020