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FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON BUSINESS APPOINTMENTS

Advice to Lord Udny-Lister Kt, former Special Adviser at No.10 at the Cabinet Office, on business appointments after leaving Crown service

Advice letter: Edward Udny-Lister, Senior Adviser, HSBC

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Lord Udny-Lister Kt left his role as Special Adviser at No.10 in January 2021

Senior Adviser to the Non-Executive Group Chairman of HSBC

Lord Udny-Lister sought the Committee’s advice about taking up an appointment with HSBC

The letter containing the Committee’s consideration and the conditions imposed on the appointment was sent in September 2021 and the appointment was taken up later that month. An accessible version of the letter is available here

Published 17 September 2021

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) is investigating the source of the incident.

A single case of classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) has been confirmed on a farm in?Somerset, the Animal and Plant Health Agency confirmed today (Friday 17 September).

The animal is deceased and has been removed from the farm. There is no risk to food safety.

In line with the?government’s?disease prevention response plan, precautionary movement restrictions have been put in place to stop the movement of livestock in the area while further investigations continue to identify the origin of the disease.?

Chief Veterinary Officer Christine Middlemiss said:?

A single case of classical?BSE has been confirmed on a farm in Somerset. The animal died on farm and was tested as part of our TSE surveillance controls.

Movement restrictions have been put in place on the farm. This is standard procedure until we have a clear understanding of the origin of the disease.?This is further proof that our surveillance system for detecting?and containing?this type of?disease is working.

We recognise this will be a traumatic time for the farmer and we are on hand to offer advice through this difficult period.

The UK’s overall risk status for BSE remains at ‘controlled’ and there is no risk to food safety or public health.

A Food Standards Agency spokesperson said:?

There are strict controls in place to protect consumers from the risk of BSE, including controls on animal feed, and removal of the parts of cattle most likely to carry BSE infectivity.??

Consumers can be reassured that these important protection measures remain in place and that Food Standards Agency Official Veterinarians and Meat Hygiene Inspectors working in all abattoirs in England will continue to ensure that the safety of consumers remains the top priority.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency will now begin a thorough investigation of the herd, the premises, potential sources of infection and will produce a full report on the incident in due course.

There have been five cases of confirmed BSE in the UK since 2014, all of these have been in animals which, as fallen stock, were not destined for the human food chain and posed no risk to the general public.?

In line with international commitments, the World Organisation for Animal Health and trading partners have been informed of the case. This does not affect the UK’s ability t

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) is investigating the source of the incident.

A single case of classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) has been confirmed on a farm in?Somerset, the Animal and Plant Health Agency confirmed today (Friday 17 September).

The animal is deceased and has been removed from the farm. There is no risk to food safety.

In line with the?government’s?disease prevention response plan, precautionary movement restrictions have been put in place on the farm while further investigations continue to identify the origin of the disease.?

Chief Veterinary Officer Christine Middlemiss said:?

A single case of classical?BSE has been confirmed on a farm in Somerset. The animal died on farm and was tested as part of our TSE surveillance controls.

Movement restrictions have been put in place on the farm. This is standard procedure until we have a clear understanding of the origin of the disease.?This is further proof that our surveillance system for detecting?and containing?this type of?disease is working.

We recognise this will be a traumatic time for the farmer and we are on hand to offer advice through this difficult period.

The UK’s overall risk status for BSE remains at ‘controlled’ and there is no risk to food safety or public health.

A Food Standards Agency spokesperson said:?

There are strict controls in place to protect consumers from the risk of BSE, including controls on animal feed, and removal of the parts of cattle most likely to carry BSE infectivity.??

Consumers can be reassured that these important protection measures remain in place and that Food Standards Agency Official Veterinarians and Meat Hygiene Inspectors working in all abattoirs in England will continue to ensure that the safety of consumers remains the top priority.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency will now begin a thorough investigation of the herd, the premises, potential sources of infection and will produce a full report on the incident in due course.

There have been five cases of confirmed BSE in the UK since 2014, all of these have been in animals which, as fallen stock, were not destined for the human food chain and posed no risk to the general public.?

In line with international commitments, the World Organisation for Animal Health and trading partners have been informed of the case. This does not affect the UK’s ability t

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) monthly reports on monitoring of disease in livestock and poultry.

Details

The monthly report is a summary of disease data gathered by the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) Veterinary Investigation Centres.

It is part of the disease surveillance system which is used to monitor new diseases in cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry, and to monitor changing trends in existing diseases.

A similar report is produced for Scotland by the Scottish Agricultural Colleges Veterinary Services Division (SACVSD).

See the APHA animal disease surveillance reports collection for further reports.

Published 1 September 2020
Last updated 17 September 2021 + show all updates
  1. Added reports for June, July and August 2021.

  2. Added reports for December 2020, January 2021 and February 2021.

  3. Added link to disease surveillance report for March 2021.

  4. Added link to disease surveillance report for November 2020.

  5. Added link to disease surveillance report for October 2020.

  6. Added link to disease surveillance report for September 2020.

  7. Added link to disease surveillance report for August 2020.

  8. First published.

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

Field inspection reports for the Genetic Modification Inspectorate deliberate release inspection programme in England.

Controls on the environmental release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for research purposes are implemented by the competent authorities of the UK. These are in:

In England, consent to release a GMO is issued by the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Specific consents are issued with strict conditions for conducting and managing any genetically modified organism release. It’s the GM Inspectorate’s responsibility to ensure that consent holders (the people granted consent to release a GMO) are complying with these conditions by undertaking inspections of GM deliberate release field sites for research trials and commercial consents.

For research trials consents, conditions may be imposed such as:

  • the location and size of GM release
  • separation distances from other crops
  • presence and size of pollen barriers
  • control of volunteers and flowering plants
  • monitoring requirements

GM Inspectors must verify that the release is compliant with these conditions. If the release is not compliant the consent holder will be contacted and the matter investigated.

For more information on obtaining consent to release a GMO, see GMO: applications and decisions.

Research trial release reports

Reports on field inspection visits are produced and submitted to Defra within 5 working days. The consent holder and Defra have 20 days to comment on the factual details of the report before the reports are placed on the public register and published.

Reports from 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022

Reports from 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021

Reports from 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020

Reports from 1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ANIMAL PLANT HEALTH AGENCY

Provides data on reports of salmonella in livestock, birds and wildlife in Great Britain.

Salmonella in livestock production in Great Britain, 2020

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Details

This annual publication provides data on reports of salmonella in livestock species in Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland) which was collected and collated by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). Each year includes data from previous years for comparative purposes.

The data in the first 11 chapters cover reports of salmonella in:

  • livestock, with separate chapters for the main species
  • wildlife
  • animal feedingstuffs

Chapter 12 covers the antimicrobial susceptibility of salmonella in England and Wales only.

Previous reports

See previous salmonella in livestock production in GB reports.

Published 18 October 2019
Last updated 17 September 2021 + show all updates
  1. Added salmonella in livestock production in Great Britain for 2020.

  2. Published salmonella in livestock production in GB 2019 report.

  3. Updated table 6.6 in Salmonella in Livestock Production 2018

  4. First published.

Brexit

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  ATTORNEY GENERALS OFFICE

The Prime Minister has appointed Alex Chalk MP as Solicitor General.

The Prime Minister has appointed Alex Chalk MP as Solicitor General.

The Solicitor General will oversee the work of the Law Officers’ Departments which include the Crown Prosecution Service and Serious Fraud Office, as well as the Government Legal Department and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate.

The Solicitor General also carries out a number of functions in the public interest, such as considering unduly lenient sentences, and taking action when there has been a contempt of court. These functions are carried out independently of his role as a Government minister.

Commenting on his appointment, Solicitor General Alex Chalk MP said:

“I am delighted to be appointed as Solicitor General for England and Wales. I am looking forward to working with the Attorney General, Suella Braverman, to help build back better and safer from the pandemic and to continue the Government’s work in rebuilding confidence and trust in our criminal justice system.

“It is an honour to be joining this unique and historic government department which occupies a vital place at t

MONDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  BONA VACANTIA

A list of unclaimed estates held by the Treasury Solicitor. Last updated 20th September 2021

The Division publishes a list of unclaimed estates which have been recently referred, but not yet administered, and historic cases which have been administered but not yet been claimed within the time limits for doing so.

The list

Unclaimed estates list (CSV, 1.06MB)

Some people have experienced an intermittent problem downloading the Unclaimed estates list. We are investigating the cause of the issue.

The list is published in a Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format. This acts like a spreadsheet and although it can be opened in any text editor it is is best viewed in a spreadsheet application, such as Microsoft Excel, Google Docs or OpenOffice Calc.

If you are looking for a particular estate you can search by using Ctrl-F in your browser, text editor or spreadsheet application.

The list is updated every working day and newly advertised estates appear at the top of the list. After one day of publication, new estates drop into the rest of the list in alphabetical order.

Any estates where the Bona Vacantia division (BVD) no longer has an interest, for example, when a claim to an estate has been admitted, will be removed daily. Estates where the 30 year time limit from the date of death has expired are also removed.

BVD provides as much genealogical information as it holds on its files, subject to its obligations under the Data Protection Act and any other legal requirements. If a field is blank then BVD either do not hold the information or it may only be held in paper files stored off-site.

If you have a claim

Further information can be found in the guide on how to Make a claim to a deceased person’s estate

Disclaimer

Please note: The list cannot be guaranteed to be complete and correct and no warranties are given or implied to that effect. Copies of the list held on other sources or provided by third parties other than the Treasury Solicitor cannot be guaranteed to be accurate or up-to-date. The Treasury Solicitor does not accept any responsibility for any loss whatsoever which might result from reliance thereon.

Published 6 December 2013
Last updated 20 September 2021 + show all updates
  1. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  2. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  3. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  4. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  5. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  6. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

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  11. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  12. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

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  15. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

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  19. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  20. Daily update of the unclaimed list.

  21. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  BONA VACANTIA

A list of unclaimed estates held by the Treasury Solicitor. Last updated 17th September 2021

The Division publishes a list of unclaimed estates which have been recently referred, but not yet administered, and historic cases which have been administered but not yet been claimed within the time limits for doing so.

The list

Unclaimed estates list (CSV, 1.06MB)

Some people have experienced an intermittent problem downloading the Unclaimed estates list. We are investigating the cause of the issue.

The list is published in a Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format. This acts like a spreadsheet and although it can be opened in any text editor it is is best viewed in a spreadsheet application, such as Microsoft Excel, Google Docs or OpenOffice Calc.

If you are looking for a particular estate you can search by using Ctrl-F in your browser, text editor or spreadsheet application.

The list is updated every working day and newly advertised estates appear at the top of the list. After one day of publication, new estates drop into the rest of the list in alphabetical order.

Any estates where the Bona Vacantia division (BVD) no longer has an interest, for example, when a claim to an estate has been admitted, will be removed daily. Estates where the 30 year time limit from the date of death has expired are also removed.

BVD provides as much genealogical information as it holds on its files, subject to its obligations under the Data Protection Act and any other legal requirements. If a field is blank then BVD either do not hold the information or it may only be held in paper files stored off-site.

If you have a claim

Further information can be found in the guide on how to Make a claim to a deceased person’s estate

Disclaimer

Please note: The list cannot be guaranteed to be complete and correct and no warranties are given or implied to that effect. Copies of the list held on other sources or provided by third parties other than the Treasury Solicitor cannot be guaranteed to be accurate or up-to-date. The Treasury Solicitor does not accept any responsibility for any loss whatsoever which might result from reliance thereon.

Published 6 December 2013
Last updated 17 September 2021 + show all updates
  1. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  2. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  3. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  4. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  5. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  6. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  7. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  8. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  9. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  10. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  11. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  12. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  13. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  14. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  15. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  16. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  17. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  18. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list.

  19. Daily update of the unclaimed list.

  20. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

  21. Daily update of the unclaimed estates list

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  BRITISH CATTLE MOVEMENT SERVICE

How to comply with cattle identification regulations when exporting or moving cattle out of Great Britain

Cattle moving out or exported from Great Britain must be registered and tagged and meet certain criteria. You must also report this movement to the British Cattle Movement Service (BCMS) so they get the information within 3 days.

Requirements for all cattle exported or moved out of Great Britain

You are only allowed to export or move cattle out of Great Britain that:

  • were born, imported or moved into Great Britain on or after 1 August 1996
  • have a full, valid passport with complete movement history (CPP52 or CPP13)
  • have two approved ear tags, one in each ear, that show the same unique number
  • are not subject to a whole-herd or individual movement restriction

Animals must also meet certain health and welfare requirements.

Cattle born before 1 August 1996 are not allowed into the domestic food chain and cannot be exported.

Additional tagging requirements for cattle that are exported from or moved out of Great Britain to an EU Country or Northern Ireland from 1 January 2021

From 1 January 2021, all cattle exported from or moved out of Great Britain to an EU Country or Northern Ireland need to be identified with the ISO country code, which is ‘GB’ for the UK.

For full details please see the new UK-wide advice on ear tags for livestock exporters.

How to report live cattle exported or moved out of Great Britain

When exporting or moving live cattle out of Great Britain, you must update your holding register and report the off movement to BCMS. The information must arrive with BCMS within 3 days of the movement.

You must also complete the documents listed below and send them to BCMS:

  • Bovine-CON (consignor confirmation of loading) form
  • health certificates
  • list of identification numbers (Bovine-SCH)

Call BCMS (0345 050 1234) or the Helpline for cattle keepers in Wales (0345 050 3456) to request copies of these. Or email the enquires mailbox on bcmsenquiries@rpa.gov.uk giving details of the documents you need

You’ll need to use your County Parish Holding (CPH) number on all documents you send to BCMS. If you have a holding in England or Wales that has been approved as an assembly centre, BCMS will have sent you bar code labels for your additional CPH number.

If you have a holding in Scotland, your CPH number will stay the same. Use this number and the corresponding bar code labels to report live cattle exported or moved out of Great Britain.

Published 6 May 2014
Last updated 17 September 2021 + show all updates
  1. Links to Bovine-CON (consignor confirmation of loading) form and list of identification numbers (Bovine-SCH) removed.

  2. Added section to explain that as a result of the UK exiting the EU, the tagging requirements for cattle that are exported from or moved out of GB to an EU Country or Northern Ireland have changed from 1 January.

  3. First published.

Published 20 September 2021

MONDAY, 20 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  CABINET OFFICE

Civil Service diversity in South West (England) by department, as at 31 March 2021.

Civil Service diversity in South West (England) by department: 2021

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Details

Civil Service diversity in South West (England) by department, as at 31 March 2021.

Published 20 September 2021

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  CABINET OFFICE

In a speech on Energy Action Day, COP26 President-Designate Alok Sharma called on nations to scale up clean power more quickly and meet Paris Agreement targets

Greetings to you all.

It is a pleasure to join you today, and thank you to the Danish Government, IRENA, UNEP and WEF and all other partners involved in organising Energy Action Day.

The subject of this panel event, the coal to clean power transition, is absolutely vital.

Because, we want to avoid the worst effects of climate change, we must consign coal power to history.

There’s really no question about it.

When the countries of the world signed the Paris Agreement in 2015, they committed to limit the rise in global temperature to well below two degrees, aiming for 1.5 degrees.

Because the science shows that this will prevent the most severe impacts.

But that 1.5 degree limit will slip out of reach unless we act immediately.

That was the clear message from the IPCC in August, in their report on the latest climate science.

To keep 1.5 alive we must halve global emissions by 2030.

So the time for talking is behind us. We need urgent action now.

And particularly on power, which accounts for a quarter of global emissions.

Decarbonising our power systems is eminently achievable given the plummeting price of renewables and the stranded asset risk coal presents as a result.

So accelerating the clean energy transition is an absolute focus of the UK’s COP26 Presidency.

And we are seeing progress.

The Climate Vulnerable Forum has recently released a statement supporting no new coal power.

And countries like Pakistan have committed to put an end to new coal power.

I look forward to hearing from Minister Aslam in this session about Pakistan’s clean energy transition, and how international partners can support it.

Here in the UK, coal is down to less than 2 percent of our energy mix and we plan to phase it out entirely by the end of 2024.

And under our Presidency of the G7, the entire group has committed to move to overwhelmingly decarbonised power systems in the 2030s, and to stop financing coal internationally.

South Korea will end international coal finance too, meaning two of the three largest funders in the world will no longer be putting their money into coal.

To support the clean energy transition around the world, our COP26 Presidency has also been building up international collaboration.

Because we recognise that by working together, we make progress faster.

Last year we launched the COP26 Energy Transition Council, this brings together more than 20 governments, and 15 international institutions, including development banks, to support the green transition in developing countries.

We have also launched the Rapid Response Facility, which is currently responding to over 15 country requests for timely, flexible support with their energy transition.

And we plan to build on these initiatives beyond Glasgow, so that strong partnerships between governments, investors and communities continue to drive the energy revolution.

We urge countries, regions, companies and investors to join the Powering Past Coal Alliance, to accelerate the move away from coal, and the number of national government members has increased 25 percent since COP25.

And we ask financial institutions to move away from coal, and seize the opportunity of investing in clean power alternatives.

To encourage investments in emerging markets we have brought governments, investors and industry together in dialogues, including through the Energy Transition Council, to build investment confidence.

And I am very pleased that public financial institutions are supporting countries with the energy transition.

The “Climate Investments Funds” are an excellent example, and you will hear from their CEO, Mafalda Duarte, today, as well as hearing from Mary Quaney, CEO of Mainstream Renewable Power, a leader in working with local countries and communities to deliver the clean energy transition in new markets.

The progress we have seen is fantastic but there is much further to go ahead of COP26.

Because a gap remains. And it is far too large.

480 gigawatts-worth of new coal power stations are still planned around the world.

So ahead of COP26 and at the summit itself, we need governments to make those strong, clear commitments to end polluting coal generation and prioritise clean power.

We urge countries to put an end to coal power.

By phasing out existing plants, committing not to build any new ones, and putting an end to international coal finance.

We need all investors, acting on our shared responsibility, to protect our planet.

And we need to keep building up the international collaboration, at COP26 and beyond it, to accelerate the clean energy revolution over this vital decade.

Which, frankly, it is no exaggeration to say, will determine the course of our planet’s future.

I hope the UN High-Level Dialogue on Energy next week will see countries announcing ambitious action on energy, including through their Energy Compacts.

And on COP26 Energy Day we will highlight countries’ commitments to scale up clean power, stop new coal and support a just transition.

Because the world needs to see urgent action on power – particularly the global exit from coal – to keep 1.5 degrees alive and ensure access to clean, affordable and reliable energy for all.

And I hope that today, you will have a productive discussion on the practical ways in which we can spur action on energy, supported by international collaboration.

With a panel like this, composed of trailblazers in their respective areas, working together, I am sure that you will.

So let’s keep working together to revolutionise the way we power the world.

Thank you.

Published 17 September 2021

FRIDAY, 17 SEPTEMBER 2021  |  CENTRAL ARBITRATION COMMITTEE

The submission of applications and complaints to the CAC.

In light of the Government’s announcement on Monday 16 March 2020, all applications and complaints to the CAC should be submitted electronically to:

Details

The decisions set out:

  • names of CAC panel members
  • name of the case manager
  • issue in dispute
  • views of the parties
  • considerations of the panel
  • final decision
Published 17 September 2021