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Detailed guide: Funding for development research

Department For International Development

October 17
13:10 2019

Overview

This page is aimed at organisations and researchers looking for information on funding opportunities in development research. It lists in date order a selection of current calls with a research, evidence or evaluation theme which are being run by DFID or by our programme partners. If you are interested in working for DFID you should also look at our supplier portal.

What contributes to success for Research and Development for diseases of poverty? A current and prospective analysis

There have been long standing market failures in the development of new products for diseases that disproportionately affect the poorest. Over the last 20 years there has been an increasing focus on the need to overcome a number of barriers to research and development (R&D) investment in health technologies for developing countries. These include high capital costs to undertake the R&D, the long time between R&D investment and commercialisation of the resulting technology, insufficient commercial returns, and high technical risk associated with the underlying R&D.

Product Development Partnerships (PDPs) have emerged as one approach to overcoming these barriers. PDPs are public private partnerships that address a wide range of diseases and work on accelerating the development of drugs, vaccines, diagnostics and other technologies. Evidence suggests that these new forms of collaboration, in which risks and costs are shared in order to address market failure, result in quicker, less costly development of the technologies with greater public health benefits relative to existing technologies. They also improve the overall enabling environment so other actors can do the same.

The aim of this review is to assess the extent to which the assumptions underpinning the PDP model are still valid, provide an up to date overview of their activity and impact to date and provide recommendations to funders on how best to optimise future investments through the PDP model.

Interested parties are invited to submit tenders by 2pm UK time on Friday 8th November 2019.

Rapid evidence assessment on serious and organised crime development impacts

Serious and Organised Crime (SOC) is both a major threat to the UKs national security and to its development objectives internationally. DFID has committed to supporting the delivery of the HMG Serious and Organised Crime Strategy (2018), with a focus on tackling the root causes and drivers of serious and organised crime and the harmful impacts it has on development processes. To inform development of new SOC programming, DFID needs to better understand the evidence on drivers of, and effective approaches to addressing, serious and organised crime.

DFID is committed to ensuring that policy and programmes are informed by a rigorous and up-to-date understanding of the evidence base. As the academic literature on SOC is rapidly growing, including in developing contexts, this requires systematically identifying existing work and evidence gaps. Specifically, we want to better understand the evidence on drivers of, and effective approaches to addressing, serious and organised crime. This will be used to inform the development of a theory of change (ToC) that will in turn be used to shape and inform DFIDs, and wider HMG, programming responses to SOC.

To build our understanding in this area, we wish to commission a rapid evidence assessment (REA) that will provide a structured review and synthesis of the literature on understanding the impact of serious and organized crime on key development outcomes including a comprehensive understanding of the factors which enable SOC to operate in any given context, both the stabilising and destablising impacts (incl. harms caused by SOC), and the mechanisms through which SOC impacts on development (i.e. how SOC affects specific outcomes).

Interested parties are invited to submit tenders by 2pm UK time on Monday 28 October 2019.

Rapid evidence assessment on serious and organised crime what works

Serious and Organised Crime (SOC) is both a major threat to the UKs national security and to its development objectives internationally. DFID has committed to supporting the delivery of the HMG Serious and Organised Crime Strategy (2018), with a focus on tackling the root causes and drivers of serious and organi

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